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Endurance Rules 2020 – Annex 5

136

The proposed Endurance Rules modifications for 2020 is presented to the National Federations (NFs) in a completely new rule book, with a new structure and revised wording.

We continue a series of articles to review all the new proposed rules, article by article.

Artilce 800 & 801: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-800-801/
Artilce 802 & 803: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-802-803/
Artilce 804 & 805: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-804-805/
Artilce 806 – 808: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-806-808/
Article 809: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-809/
Artilce 810 – 812: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-810-812/
Artilce 813 – 815: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-813-815/
Artilce 816: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-816/
Artilce 817 – 819: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-817-819/
Artilce 820 – 822: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-820-822/
Artilce 823 – 825: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-823-825/
Artilce 826 – 829: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-826-829/
Artilce 830 – 833: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-830-833/
Artilce 834 – 836: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-834-836/
Artilce 837 – 838: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-837-838/
Artilce 839 – 842: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-839-842/
Artilce 843: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-843/
Artilce 844 – 847: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-844-847/
Artilce 848 – 851: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-848-851/
Artilce 852 – 856: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-852-856/
Artilce 857 – 862: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-857-862/
Artilce 863 – 867: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-article-863-867/
Annex 1: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-annex-1/
Annex 2: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-annex-2/
Annex 3: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-annex-3/
Annex 4: http://fair-endurance.com/endurance-rules-2020-annex-4/

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ANNEX 5: HORSE INSPECTIONS, EXAMINATIONS, CONTROL OF MEDICATION

[If these Endurance Rules (including Annex 5) are approved, the FEI Veterinary Regulations will be amended accordingly]

PART A: VETERINARY CONTROL

1. Veterinary Commission and Horse welfare

1.1 As set out in Article 854.1, the Veterinary Commission is responsible for making decisions in relation to, and advising the Ground Jury on all matters concerning, Horse health, safety, and welfare at Events.

1.2 Unless specified otherwise, any decisions required to be taken by a panel of three Veterinarians will be based on a majority vote. Where the panel is required to determine whether or not a Horse should be designated as ‘Failed to Qualify’, each of the three Veterinarians must independently (without conferring with each other) write their decision on a confidential voting slip (marked pass or fail) and provide it directly to a member of the Ground Jury.

1.3 The Ground Jury will make decisions concerning Horse welfare based on the decisions and advice of the Veterinary Commission. Any decision of the Veterinary Commission or the Ground Jury taken on the direct advice of the Veterinary Commission is final, and may not be appealed.

1.4 Where the Ground Jury designates a Horse as ‘Failed to Qualify’, it must provide the reasons for doing so, which must be recorded in accordance with paragraphs 3.1 and 3.4(c), below.

2. Foreign Veterinary Delegate / Primary Veterinary Delegate

If no Foreign Veterinary Delegate is appointed for an Event, that role will be fulfilled by the Primary Veterinary Delegate.

3. Horse records

3.1 For each Event, individual Vet Cards must be issued for each Horse before the First (Pre-Ride) Inspection and must be completed for all subsequent Horse Inspections. The Vet Cards may be in paper or electronic form, provided that only the FEI-issued paper/electronic forms are used, and (if the OC opts to use the electronic form) then the OC must specify this in the Competition Schedule.

3.2 All the relevant information required at the Horse Inspections (see paragraph 9.2) and any other details from other veterinary inspections/examinations or as otherwise required under this Annex 5 or the FEI Veterinary Regulations must be recorded on the Vet Card for each Combination and must be available at all subsequent inspections and examinations.

3.3 Athletes are entitled to see and copy the record referring to their Horses immediately after each Horse Inspection.

3.4 After each Event:

(a) details of a Horse’s completed distance to the nearest Vet Gate, reasons for non-classification (metabolic, irregular gait or both), treatments at the venue, referral for hospitalisation, Mandatory Out of Competition Period(s) and any other comments necessary to protect the Horse’s future safety and welfare deemed necessary by the Veterinary Commission must be recorded on the Vet Card;

(b) all Vet Cards must be sent to the FEI Veterinary Department in electronic form within 72 hours of the end of the Event, but copies may also be retained by the OC (if paper cards are used during the Event, they must be scanned or photographed or the details must be manually entered into an electronic form, e.g. Word); and

(c) the Veterinary Report for the Event must be sent to the FEI Veterinary Department in electronic form in accordance with the FEI Veterinary Regulations and any other requirements for reporting set out in the FEI Veterinary Regulations. This report must include details of any injury or disease suffered by a Horse and the treatment provided for such injury/disease.

3.5 Only the Veterinary Commission and/or President of the Ground Jury may make entries in the official record.

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All Vet Cards must be sent to the FEI Veterinary Department in electronic form within 72 hours of the end of the Event (if paper cards are used during the Event, they must be scanned or photographed or the details must be manually entered into an electronic form, e.g. Word).

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4. Veterinary supervision at Events

To ensure that Horses have adequate rest between travel and Competition, and to ensure adequate veterinary supervision before and after a ride, at all CEI 2*, CEI 3*, and Championships, subject to the discretion of the Veterinary Commission, all competing Horses must remain in the stable area at the Event under veterinary supervision (by the President of the Veterinary Commission, the Foreign Veterinary Delegate, a member of the Veterinary Commission, and/or a Treating Veterinarian) for (i) a minimum of eight hours before the First (Pre-Ride) Inspection (subject to published closing times for the stables), and (ii) a minimum of eight hours after the scheduled finish for the Competition. If a Horse has not completed all Phases of the Competition, the President of the Veterinary Commission, Foreign Veterinary Delegate and President of the Ground Jury may authorise the release of a Horse at an earlier time.

5. Veterinary services and aftercare

5.1 The President of the Veterinary Commission or Foreign Veterinary Delegate are required to provide for appropriate aftercare and veterinary services as set out in the FEI Veterinary Regulations. For Championships, triage and emergency treatment facilities must be provided on site, and arrangements must also be made with a designated referral centre to refer Horses for further assessment and treatment if necessary. Such arrangements must be clearly written in the Competition Schedule and approved by the Technical Delegate in collaboration with the President of the Veterinary Commission and Foreign Veterinary Delegate prior to the Examination on Arrival.

5.2 After the First (Pre-Ride) Inspection, the President of the Veterinary Commission and Foreign Veterinary Delegate in consultation with the Ground Jury may recommend changes in the treatment arrangements including the placement of members of the Veterinary Commission, or scheduling of their availability, for help in the treatment/aftercare area. Such arrangements must identify the Treating Veterinarian(s) and the treatment group must include a Veterinarian licensed to practice Veterinary medicine in that geographical location.

6. Horse fatality

6.1 If a Horse dies for any reason at the Event, the Foreign Veterinary Delegate must ensure that the procedures set out in the FEI Veterinary Regulations are carried out.

6.2 If a Horse that has competed in an Event dies for any reason that is related to its participation in that Event (including where the Horse suffers a Catastrophic Injury or Serious Injury requiring referral to a designated referral centre), the Person Responsible (as defined in the FEI General Regulations) and the Horse’s administering National Federation must notify the FEI Veterinary Department as required under the FEI Veterinary Regulations, and also comply with the procedures set out in Article 840 of the Endurance Rules and in the FEI Veterinary Regulations.

PART B: HORSE INSPECTIONS AND EXAMINATIONS

7. Examination on Arrival

7.1 Examination on Arrival must be carried out at all FEI Events and take place in a designated Examination on Arrival area as described in the FEI Veterinary Regulations. The Foreign Veterinary Delegate (or his appointee, who must be an FEI Veterinarian) must examine all Horses arriving at the Event venue and collect their FEI passports, before they are allowed to enter the stables.

(a) For CEIs, the Examination on Arrival may be coupled with the First (Pre-Ride) Inspection, but (for biosecurity reasons) Horses may not enter the stables at the Event before the Examination on Arrival is completed.

(b) At CEIOs and Championships, the Examination on Arrival and First (Pre-Ride) Inspection must occur separately and far enough in advance to allow for isolation of compromised Horses and their travelling partners until health questions or concerns are satisfied. The OC must provide adequate isolation facilities for those purposes.

7.2 During the Examination on Arrival, a member of the Veterinary Commission must:

(a) verify the identity of the Horse from its FEI passport, using the diagram, description, and (if applicable) the microchip number;

(b) check that the Horse has been vaccinated against equine influenza in accordance with the FEI Veterinary Regulations;

(c) verify whether all details relating to the Horse’s identification, vaccination record and other health requirements are correctly recorded in the Horse’s Passport;

(d) ensure that the Horse does not have any clinical signs of infectious disease. This may include a clinical examination to assess the heart, respiratory rate, body temperature and the checking of any other clinical parameters; and

(e) palpate the limbs and/or body only when there is a concern of a suspected injury or illness sustained during travel.

7.3 Following the Examination on Arrival, any Horse considered not fit to compete must be reported to the Ground Jury before the First (Pre-Ride) Inspection. The Veterinary Commission/Foreign Veterinary Delegate must discuss the matter with the Ground Jury, and the Ground Jury (if it considers necessary) may remove the Horse from the Competition before the First (Pre-Ride) Inspection.

7.4 Horses that are not vaccinated against Equine Influenza as required under the FEI Veterinary Regulations or whose vaccination status cannot be confirmed (e.g. failure to produce an FEI passport) must be refused permission to enter the Event stables and stabled in the isolation stables.

7.5 Horses that have any clinical findings consistent with non-infectious diseases or injury must be reported to the Veterinary Commission/Foreign Veterinary Delegate as soon as possible.

7.6 Horses must be stabled in the isolation stables if they show any clinical signs of infectious disease, or have been in contact with other Horses that show clinical signs of infectious disease. These Horses must be refused permission to enter the Event stables and stabled in isolation stables pending recovery, or until alternative arrangements have been made.

7.7 Any biosecurity concern must be immediately reported to the Veterinary Commission/Foreign Veterinary Delegate.

8. Horse Inspections

8.1 Following the Examination on Arrival, all Horse Inspections during the Competition will be performed by the Veterinary Commission and will follow the same format. If there are any changes to how the Horse Inspections will be conducted, that must be announced prior to the Competition by the Ground Jury or published in the Competition Schedule.

8.2 First (Pre-Ride) Inspection: The First (Pre-Ride) Inspection will take place either on the day preceding or early on the day that the first Loop of the ride starts.

8.3 Horse Inspections at each Vet Gate: Horse Inspections will take place in the Vetting Area at the Vet Gate after the end of each Loop.

8.4 Compulsory re-inspections: The Veterinary Commission, in consultation with the Ground Jury, may require that all Horses in the Competition (or all Horses meeting certain criteria, see e.g. Article 816.6.5) be presented for a compulsory re-inspection at specified Vet Gates. Compulsory re-inspections will take place in the last 15 minutes of a Combination’s Hold Time at the relevant Vet Gate.

8.5 Requested re-inspections: Any member of Veterinary Commission may ask an Athlete to present his Horse for re-inspection at any Vet Gate if it has any concerns about the Horse. Vet-requested re-inspections will take place in the last 15 minutes of a Combination’s Hold Time at the relevant Vet Gate.

8.6 Final Horse Inspection: The Final Horse Inspection will take place after the Horse crosses the finish line of the ride.

8.7 Veterinary inspection in case of visible blood:

If blood is visible on a Horse during a Horse Inspection, the Horse must be examined by a panel of three Veterinarians. If the panel of Veterinarians determines (i) that the Horse has free-flowing blood from an injury or orifice, or (ii) that continuing in the Competition will in any way endanger (or risk endangering) the welfare of the Horse, the Horse must be designated as Failed to Qualify. The Horse may continue in the Competition only if the panel of Veterinarians determines that the blood is not free-flowing and that continuing in the Competition does not in any way endanger (or risk endangering) the welfare of the Horse (for example, where the Horse suffers a minor scratch from a tree branch). The Veterinary Delegate must report any blood visible on the Horse (regardless of its determination) in the Veterinary Report for the Event (see the FEI Veterinary Regulations), including the Horse’s FEI registration number, a description of the injury, a photograph of the injury, the determination of the panel with reasons, and the names and FEI registration numbers of each of the three panel members that examined the Horse).

8.8 Other veterinary inspections:

The Veterinary Commission or Ground Jury may select any Horses at random at any time to submit to a Horse Inspection during the Competition.

9. Assessments during Horse Inspections

9.1 The Veterinarians’ responsibilities to evaluate a Horse are the same for all Horse Inspections, i.e. the same standards apply to judging fitness to continue in the Competition with respect to heart rate, metabolic status, gait and general condition up to and including the Final Horse Inspection.

9.2 Assessments for all Horse Inspections: The Veterinarian conducting the Horse Inspection will assess the Horse’s general condition and its metabolic status, while taking into account the Horse’s recovery time (see Article 816.2). The assessments will include heart rate, mucous membrane characteristics, capillary refill time, intestinal activity (gut sounds), estimated hydration status, and demeanour. The Veterinarian will also evaluate the Horse’s gait and assess any soreness on palpation of the back and girth, the texture and any sensitivity of the muscles, and any minor injuries including in the mouth or around the saddle and girth area. These assessments and any other observations regarding the Horse’s condition must be recorded on the Vet Card.

9.3 Heart rate assessment procedure:

(a) All heart rate assessments must be undertaken by a member of the Veterinary Commission. Heart rate is the first parameter to be examined and recorded during the Horse Inspection. It is an essential criterion to accurately assess the Horse’s recovery and fitness to continue. The recovery time of the Horse must also be made available to the Veterinarian conducting the Horse Inspection.

(b) The maximum heart rate parameters are set out in Article 816.6.1 (which are subject to modification pursuant to Article 816.9). Horses with heart rates higher than maximum heart rate parameters will not be allowed to continue in the Competition and will be designated as ‘Failed to Qualify – metabolic’ (FTQ – ME). Any abnormal heart sounds must be recorded on the Vet Card.

(c) Every effort should be taken to accurately record the heart rate. If the examination of the heart rate is disrupted due to movement or excitement of the Horse rendering the examination impossible or inaccurate, the examination is stopped and recommenced when the Horse is settled. If the Athlete, Crew Member, or other Person Responsible (as defined in the FEI General Regulations) deliberately disrupts the Horse Inspection, the Horse will fail the inspection.

(d) The heart rate of the Horse must be measured using either a stethoscope or an FEI-approved electronic heart rate monitor. When the Horse is presented for inspection, the stethoscope or the electronic heart rate monitor must be applied to the left side of the chest wall at approximately the level of the elbow. The examiner should locate the best position to measure the heart rate.

(e) Starting and timing the assessment:

(i) Where a stethoscope is used, a stop watch must be used to time the count. An assessment must be taken after 15 seconds and then (if necessary further to the provisions below) at 60 seconds. To evaluate the heart rate after 15 seconds under paragraph (f)(i) below, the number of heart beats counted in 15 seconds must be multiplied by four. The stop watch must be started when the heart beat is audible and then the count starts on the next heartbeat.

(ii) Where an electronic heart rate monitor is used, the monitor must provide an assessment at 15-second intervals. The assessment starts when the monitor makes contact with the Horse’s chest and picks up the first heartbeat.

(f) Determining whether the Horse’s heart rate complies with the maximum heart rate parameters:

(i) If the heart rate is 5 bpm or more below the maximum heart rate parameter after the first 15-second time interval, then the reading may be recorded and the inspection completed. However, the Veterinarian may elect to continue the assessment for 60 seconds in case of any concern about the accuracy of the assessment.

(For example, if the maximum heart rate is 64bpm, the assessment may be stopped after the first 15-second time interval where i) the electronic heart rate monitor shows that the Horse’s heart rate is 59bpm or lower, or ii) the Veterinarian counts 14 heart beats or less using the stethoscope, because 14 x 4 = 56, whereas 15 x 4 = 60).

(ii) If the heart rate is within 4bpm, equal to, or greater than the maximum heart rate parameter after the first 15-second time interval, the assessment must continue for the full 60 seconds.

(For example, if the maximum heart rate is 64bpm, the assessment must continue for the full 60 seconds if after the first 15-second time interval i) the Horse’s heart rate is 60bpm or higher when using the electronic heart rate monitor, or ii) the Veterinarian counts 15 heart beats or more using a stethoscope).

(iii) If after 60 seconds the Horse’s heart rate is equal to or less than the maximum heart rate parameter, then the reading will be recorded and the inspection completed.

(iv) If the heart rate is greater than the maximum heart parameter after the 60-second assessment:

(A) Except for the Final Horse Inspection (where only one presentation is permitted), if there is sufficient time remaining for a second presentation (see Article 816.6), the Horse may be presented a second time for a heart rate re-inspection. The same procedures under paragraphs (a)-(f) above will apply to the second presentation.

(B) If there is no time remaining for a heart rate re-inspection or the Horse fails to meet the maximum heart rate parameters at the heart rate re-inspection or at the Final Horse Inspection (where only one presentation is permitted), then a confirmation procedure must be completed to confirm the failed assessment. For the confirmation procedure, the Horse must be presented to a second Veterinarian immediately after the failed assessment. If an electronic heart rate monitor was used for the failed assessment, then a second electronic heart rate monitor (or, if not available, a stethoscope) must be used. The Veterinarian will assess the Horse’s heart rate for 15 seconds only. If the Horse is to be designated as ‘Failed to Qualify’, then the Horse’s heart rate during the confirmation procedure must either be made available on a public electronic display or notified to a member of the Ground Jury. If the Horse’s heart rate is greater than the maximum heart rate parameter during the confirmation procedure, the Horse will be designated as ‘Failed to Qualify – metabolic’ (FTQ-ME).

(g) Cardiac Recovery Index (CRI):

As part of the metabolic assessment of the Horse, the Cardiac Recovery Index (CRI) of the Horse will also be measured (and recorded) at each Horse Inspection. Once the heart rate of the Horse has been recorded following the procedure above under paragraph 9.3, the Veterinarian will assess the gait of the Horse through a trot-up in the vet lane. The Athlete/Crew Member must trot the Horse 80 m (40 m out and 40 m back). The Veterinarian will start a stop watch at the start of the trot, stop it at one minute, and then measure the Horse’s heart rate for up to 60 seconds using a stethoscope. The difference between the first and second heart rates is the CRI. While measuring the second heart rate, the Veterinarian will also consider whether there any any pathological signs (e.g. such as heart murmurs or rhythm abnormalities) that may indicate that the Horse is unfit to continue. The Veterinarian may not perform any manipulation prior to taking the second heart rate that is likely to cause the heart rate of the Horse to become artificially elevated (such as by examining the Horse’s head).

9.4 Respiratory system: Abnormalities in rate or character of the breathing deemed by the Veterinary Commission to be of such a nature as to endanger the safety of the Horse will result in a Failure to Qualify designation.

9.5 General condition and metabolic status: Horses in a generally poor condition or with an abnormally high temperature will be designated as Failed to Qualify – metabolic (FTQ-ME).

9.6 Metabolic status: The metabolic status will be assessed by the examination and recording of those parameters that indicate the Horse’s fitness to continue in the Competition including mucous membranes characteristics, capillary refill time, hydration, intestinal activity (gut sounds), demeanour and Cardiac Recovery Index. Failure to Qualify due to metabolic status, musculoskeletal injuries or other reasons will require a review by a panel of three Veterinarians.

9.7 Irregular gait: During any inspection during the course, a Horse with an irregular gait that is observable through evaluation by trotting the Horse on a loose lead in hand straight out and back, without prior flexion or deep palpation, which is observed to cause pain, or threaten the immediate ability of the Horse to continue safely the Competition, will be removed from Competition and will be designated as Failed to Qualify – irregular gait (FTQ-GA). To assess irregular gait:

(a) The inspection must be carried out on a flat firm surface.

(b) If after having once trotted the Horse, the observing Veterinarian questions the Horse’s fitness to continue, the Horse will be re-trotted before a panel of three Veterinarians accompanied by a Ground Jury member.

(c) Any of the three Veterinarians may call for a single additional trot up prior to voting if he so wishes, giving the Horse and Athlete the benefit of the doubt, and will communicate that request to the member of the Ground Jury present who will request the Horse be trotted again.

(d) If following three attempts the gait cannot be evaluated due to poor presentation of the Horse or an inability of the Horse to trot the full distance, or the Horse is deemed not fit to continue due to irregular gait, the Horse will be designated as ‘Failed to Qualify – irregular gait’ (FTQ-GA).

(e) Any unusual feature about a Horse’s gait must be noted on the Vet Card of the Horse, whether it is deemed grounds for a ‘Failed to Qualify’ designation or not. Where electronic systems are used, there must be provision for this.

9.8 Soreness, laceration and wounds: Any evidence of soreness, lacerations and/or wounds in the mouth, on the limbs and/or on the body (including girth and saddle sores) must be recorded on the Vet Card. If participation in or continuation of the Competition is likely to aggravate any such soreness, lacerations or wounds or in any way endangers (or risks endangering) the welfare of the Horse, the Horse will not be allowed to continue and will be designated ‘Failed to Qualify – minor injury’ (FTQ-MI).

9.9 Shoes and feet: Horses may be ridden without shoes, but if shod they must be correctly shod and the shoes must be in a suitable condition for the Competition. Horses that are shod at the First (Pre-Ride) Inspection may cross the finish line without one or more shoes. However, if the Horse’s feet or shoes hinder its ability to compete safely or appear to be causing the Horse pain, then the Horse will be designated as Failed to Qualify – irregular gait (FTQ-GA). Equi-boots and pads must be removed at the Horse Inspection if so requested by the Veterinary Commission.

9.10 Specific additional procedures for the Final Horse Inspection:

(a) The purpose of the Final Horse Inspection is to determine whether the Horse is still fit to continue after a normal rest period for another full Loop.

(b) The assessments will be performed in the same manner, and applying the same criteria, as previous Horse Inspections during the course, save that there will be only one opportunity to qualify for presentation and the first trot-up of all Horses must be in front of a panel of three members of the Veterinary Commission accompanied by a member of the Ground Jury. A member of the panel may ask to see the Horse trot only one more time before voting takes place.

10. Decorum during Horse Inspections:

10.1 The Ground Jury, Stewards and Veterinary Commission members are responsible for enforcing the Horse Inspection decorum.

10.2 The Horse Inspection areas should (as far as practicable) be quiet and without distraction out of respect for the Athletes and Horses under the stresses of intense competition and for the welfare of the Horses.

10.3 Athletes and other persons assisting the Athletes during the Horse Inspection must respect the Horse Inspection decorum and not do (or fail to do) anything that might have a negative impact on the Horse Inspection or on any of the Horses in the Horse Inspection area.

10.4 Horses must be presented for inspection in a bridle or (subject to Article 825.2.11) head collar, but without any other tack, including saddle, boots, fly masks, Blinkers/visors and other tack. The tack must be removed in the recovery area before entering the Vetting Area. If there has been any topical application of any kind to the skin of the Horse, the Veterinary Commission will require that it be removed before the Horse may be presented for the Horse Inspection (see Article 824). If a Horse is presented at the Vetting Area with tack on (other than the bridle or head collar) or any topical application of any kind to the skin that has not been removed further to instructions of the Veterinary Commission then that Horse will fail the first presentation. The time into the Vetting Area will be cancelled and the Horse will be required to exit the Vetting Area and present for a second (final) presentation (except that there shall be no opportunity to re-present at the Final Horse Inspection).

10.5 Horses presented for vetting must proceed, as instructed, directly from the Vetting Area entrance to the designated Veterinarian in the vet lane (as instructed by the Stewards) showing constant forward motion. No action may be taken to hold back the Horse or to prevent the constant forward motion of the Horse. The Horse may not enter the vet lane until its heart rate has been assessed, and may not be trotted until so instructed by the relevant Veterinarian. In the event of breach of this provision, the Athlete will be given a fixed time penalty of five minutes and/or an Endurance Yellow Warning Card.

10.6 No gamesmanship will be tolerated in terms of delaying or interfering with a Horse Inspection. From time to time, the FEI may provide a list of conduct that is specifically prohibited during Horse Inspections. Prohibited conduct in relation to the heart rate assessment includes kneeling in front of the Horse, pulling the Horse’s head down, feeding the Horse, or in any way touching the Horse to attempt to influence the outcome of the heart rate assessment. Prohibited conduct in relation to the presentation of the Horse for the gait assessment includes unduly restricting the Horse’s head movement and/or encouraging the Horse to trot (other than as permitted under Article 822.5.3). Repeated failure to present a Horse properly for the gait assessment may result in a Horse being designated as ‘Failed to Qualify’ as set out under paragraph 9.7(d) above. Whistling or any other behaviour within the Vetting Area to encourage a Horse to urinate is prohibited.

10.7 Failure to comply with the Horse Inspection decorum, or the list of prohibited conduct that may be provided by the FEI, may (in addition to any specific penalties set out in this paragraph 10) result in Disqualification or other disciplinary action and/or such other measures as the Ground Jury and Stewards consider appropriate in the circumstances. The Ground Jury and Stewards have a wide margin of discretion to determine what steps are appropriate in relation to any misconduct during Horse Inspections.

PART C: VETERINARY TREATMENT DURING COMPETITION

See Chapter V (Veterinary Medication) of the FEI Veterinary Regulations for detail on permitted/prohibited veterinary treatments during Events.

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